Rock Climb in
Joshua Tree National Park

Information on this page is the courtesy of
Joshua Tree National Park.

 [Link to Rules on Bolts]  [Link to Regulations]  [Link to Etiquette]  [Link to Map]  [Link to Climbers Trails]  [Link to Wilderness]
 [Park Map showing excerpt area]  [Map of designated wilderness areas in the north-west corner of Joshua Tree National Park]
Approximately 80% of Joshua Tree National Park is designated as wilderness. The map to the right indicate the wilderness areas in the north-west portion of the park. Climbing is regulated differently in the wilderness areas.
 [Link to Rules on Bolts]  [Link to Regulations]  [Link to Etiquette]  [Link to Map]  [Link to Climbers Trails]  [Link to Wilderness]
NEW BOLTING PROCEDURES Jan 14, 2001
From Joshua Tree National Park's "Joshua Tree Guide" Spring 2001

"If you find an unsafe bolt in either wilderness or non-wilderness, you may replace it. Please replace on a piece-by-piece basis and use rock colored bolts and hangers. Use the existing hole whenever possible and when unable, fill the old hole with rock material blended with bonding agents. If you wish to use a power drill, you must first obtain a Special Use Permit.

To place bolts in non-wilderness, you must complete a checklist, available at park entrance stations and visitor canters. This form prompt the user to consider the impacts associated with the placement of new bolts. The park climbing committee and the park superintendent will review these check lists to ensure that impacts do not reach unacceptable levels.

A permit issued by the park super intendent is required to place new bolts in wilderness. The review process may take up to six months, so advance planning will be needed.

Two areas of the park have been designated as anchor- (bolt) free zones where bolting is not permitted. Although these bolt-free zones cover a large portion of the park, they include very few climbs.

You are responsible for knowing whether you are inside non-wilderness, wilderness or a bolt-free zone. A partial list of climbing routes located close to wilderness boundaries has been provided"..(List or formations and GPS, wilderness or not)..

"You can limit your impact on park resources by not leaving chalk or colorful webbing on the rock. Route cleaning and enhancing hand or footholds is prohibited.

If you would like to learn more about climbing in the park, stop by the Climbers Coffee on Sunday mornings at 8:00 a.m. in Hidden Valley Campground. Free coffee aside, it's a great way to meet with other climbers and to discuss climbing issues, etiquette, and regulations with park rangers."

 [Link to Rules on Bolts]  [Link to Regulations]  [Link to Etiquette]  [Link to Map]  [Link to Climbers Trails]  [Link to Wilderness]
CLIMBING ETIQUETTE

Human Waste-In areas where outhouses are not available, choose a spot at least 50 yards from water, trails and climbs. Dig a six-inch cat hole, then cover the waste and packout toilet paper in a zip-lock plastic bag.

Trash-Pack out all trash and do not leave climbing tape at base of routes.

Chalk- Limit use of chalk and make and effort to brush holds and tick marks.

Sling replacement-Use colors that blend with the rock.

Trails-Use existing trails whenever possible and be careful of fragile desert vegetation and wild life.



For more information:Joshua Tree National Park Climbing Information
PARK REGULATIONS:

Climbing within 50 feet of any rock-art site is prohibited.

It is prohibited to initiate or terminate a climb in an occupied campsite without prior permission of the occupant of that site.

Commercial climbing instruction or filming requires a commercial use license which is available at park headquarter.

Do not feed the coyotes.

Camping is limited to 30 days in all campgrounds in the park (only two weeks Oct.1 to May 31). Maximum 2 cars, 3 tents, 6 people per site.

Park cars in designated parking areas, never off the roadway on vegetation.

Bicycles are permitted on roads legally open to motorized traffic and designated bike trails. Bikes are prohibited on backcountry and nature trails.

 [Link to Rules on Bolts]  [Link to Regulations]  [Link to Etiquette]  [Link to Map]  [Link to Climbers Trails]  [Link to Wilderness]

Wilderness

Wilderness lands are federally designated areas, untrampled by humans, where we are only a visitor.
Approximately 80% of Joshua Tree National Park is designated as wilderness.

What can you do to help?

Stay on marked trails. Be aware of the fragile nature of biological (also known as cryptobiotic) soil crusts, the real victim of our footprints. This fungus/algae relationship acts as a glue that not only holds the soil together but provides vital nutrients and moisture.

Trails for Climbers

Years of wandering on unmarked trails amongst challenging topography, tall brush, and fragile rocky soils have lead to (in many places) a tangled mass of unnecessary trails impacting the Park's unique vegetation. Joshua Tree National Park was originally protected for its variety of unique vegetation types. It is the Park's aim to preserve this flora while providing visitors with a quality experience.
In an unprecedented conservation effort, the park has joined hands with the Access Fund and the California Native Plant Society to work with the climbing population in a project called "Vertical Vegetation."
The goal of the project is to minimize impact to and around the base of cliffs. The project plans to accomplish this by clearly marking the most well-trafficked trail (with the aid of local climbers) while blocking off smaller, unnecessay trail. These areas will be monitored using long-term vegetation sampling to measure changes in plant conditions. This will help the Park more effectively manage resources and visitor use.

 [Link to Rules on Bolts]  [Link to Regulations]  [Link to Etiquette]  [Link to Map]  [Link to Climbers Trails]  [Link to Wilderness]

Information on this page is the courtesy of
Joshua Tree National Park.

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